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Why Reading to Your Child Matters

reading to children

Why Reading to Your Child Matters

Written by: Kayla Polk

Shared book reading is an important educational activity in the home. Not only is it important, but it is enjoyable and fun!

What do you need to know about reading books with your child?

1.Quality and quantity of book reading interactions are important
Evidence shows that the quality and quantity of shared book reading interactions are important. Frequent parent-child book reading is associated with improvement in children’s language skills, early literacy skills and reading achievement in school. It has been recommended that parent-child home reading should begin at birth. Try reading with your child for 15-20 minutes per day, every day. The quality of the book reading interaction is also important because warm and supportive behaviors from parents are related to positive child behaviors, including focused attention, emotional outcomes, positive mood and enthusiasm for reading. Warm and supportive parent behaviors include emotional support, shared enjoyment, animated facial and vocal expressions and child encouragement.

2.Interactive book reading builds children’s language skills 
Good book reading is when the child is actively involved during reading. Because shared book reading can improve a child’s vocabulary, it is important for parents to interact and read withtheir child rather than only reading totheir child. Before you begin reading a story, introduce the author and illustrator and ask your child what the author and illustrator do. You can also talk about the parts of the book (front cover, spine, back cover). To be more interactive during reading, you can encourage your child to talk about the pictures in the story, respond to your child’s comments and questions, ask questions about the story, ask your child to predict what is going to happen next, connect the story to your child’s personal life and talk about the meaning of words. 

3.Shared book reading increases imagination
Reading aloud with your child can help them to become more curious, and can help them to experience places they have never been and things they have never seen. Imagination leads to invention and creation. Try introducing your child to new topics through books. For example, maybe your child has not yet learned about the lives of horseshoe crabs. The book Moonlight Crab Countshows children how they can be scientists while learning about a mother and daughter who observe horseshoe crabs on the beach. 

Examples of how to encourage shared book reading (adapted from Parental Influence on Child Interest in Shared Picture Book Reading by Camilo Ortiz, Rebecca M. Stowe, and David H. Arnold, 2001):

• Let your child pick the book and follow your child’s interests when selecting books.
• Use examples during reading that are related to your child’s interests.
• Ask questions throughout the story and encourage your child to ask you questions.
• Use sound effects and different voices for the characters.
• Take your child to the public library.
• Praise your child for their participation, questions, answers and listening.
• Pick books that are appropriate for your child’s age.
• If your child does not seem interested in reading with you, try again another time.
• Read in a comfortable, quiet, relaxing environment. 
• Make sure the reading time is not rushed.
• Sit close to your child while you are reading.

For book recommendations specific to your child’s age range, click the following link! https://www.cbcbooks.org/readers/reading-lists/

Reach Out and Read serves children and families through pediatric partners by providing literacy information and books to families. Use the following link to see if there is a program near you! http://www.reachoutandread.org/resource-center/find-a-program/

Visit Imagine’s fun and interactive story times. Story Times are offered in English and Spanish. Click the link for upcoming titles and times. https://www.imaginecm.org/programs-camps-events/storytimes/